This week start here:
Colin Nagy rolls out the three key principles to omotenashi (3 min), or Japanese hospitality, in a piece on the customer experience for the Skift Global Forum:

  1. anticipate needs
  2. flexibility
  3. understatement

You don’t really get to bang on about your organization’s customer-centricity (or, for that matter, your agency’s knack for experience design) until you’ve built a practice that delivers against these principles.

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From ‘SQM: The Quantified Home’ (15 min), by unofficial Dark Matter patron saint Dan Hill:

there is something intriguing in that malleability and fluidity of domestic urban space that Ravintolapäivä (pop-up restaurant day) and Airbnb enable, whether in Helsinki or San Jose. Could it suggest a more fractal organisation of space within the city, perhaps more in tune with many twenty-first-century conditions, in which an apartment can shift mode from residential to commercial to industrial over the course of an afternoon, at the behest of network logics?

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Humanity+ tackles Polanyi’s paradox and the question of whether humans are building the robots that will put us all out of work (9 min). Spoiler: we’re (probably) not.

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Bring tissues and your soft spot for human dignity: a Reddit thread for people who know how much time they have left on this hurtling sphere (∞, ironically). Incredible.

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A parametric map of the nearly 14,000 satellites currently in orbit around Earth? (∞) Yes, please.

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From a Financial Times Advisor piece on pension management (3 min) shared by reader Anne Aretz, but applicable to generally everything:

The danger for incumbents is that they ignore these changing needs, allowing the gap between the service they offer and the service desired by their customers to grow.

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Rabbit Hole: The Paris Review built a Zork-like text-based game to celebrate Michael Clune’s memoir, Gamelife (∞). This. Is. So. Good.

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Worth getting up to speed on: hybrid CNC machines that combine traditional industrial milling with additive 3D printing (4 min) capabilities. This is why we can have nice things.

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On so-called ‘super recognizers’ (5 min):

Facial recognition software managed to identify one suspect of the 4,000 captured by security cameras during the London riots. Constable Collins identified 180.

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Until next week.